X-Ray

Dental X-rays (radiographs) are images of your teeth that your dentist uses to evaluate your oral health. These X-rays are used with low levels of radiation to capture images of the interior of your teeth and gums. This can help your dentist to identify problems, like cavities, tooth decay, and impacted teeth.

X-Ray

Dental X-rays are usually performed yearly. They can happen more often if your dentist is tracking the progress of a dental problem or your dental treatment.

Factors affecting how often you get dental X-rays may include:

  • your age
  • your current oral health
  • any symptoms of oral disease
  • a history of gum disease (gingivitis) or tooth decay

If you’re a new patient, you’ll probably undergo dental X-rays so that your new dentist can get a clear picture of your dental health. That is especially important if you don’t have any X-rays from your previous dentist.

  • Bitewing. This technique involves biting down on a special piece of paper so that your dentist can see how well the crowns of your teeth match up. This is commonly used to check for cavities between teeth (interdental).
  • Occlusal. This X-ray is done when your jaw is closed to see how your upper and bottom teeth line up. It can also detect anatomical abnormalities with the floor of the mouth or the palate.
  • Occlusal. This technique captures all of your teeth in one shot.
  • Panoramic. For this type of X-ray, the machine rotates around the head. Your dentist may use this technique to check your wisdom teeth, plan for implanted dental devices, or investigate jaw problems.
  • Periapical. This technique focuses on two complete teeth from root to crown.
  • CBCT Scan. Dental cone beam computed tomography (CT) is an advanced type of X-ray equipment used when regular dental or facial X-rays are not sufficient. Your dentist may use this technology to produce three-dimensional (3-D) images of your teeth, soft tissues, nerve pathways, and bone in a single scan.
    This procedure requires little to no special preparation. Tell your doctor if there’s a possibility you are pregnant.

Extraoral X-rays may be used when your dentist suspects there might be problems in areas outside of the gums and teeth, such as the jaw.

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Step One :

X-ray being taken

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Step Two :

When the images are ready — instantly in the case of digital X-rays — your dentist will review them and check for abnormalities. If a dental hygienist is cleaning your teeth, the dentist may go over the results of the X-rays with you after your cleaning is done. The exception is if the hygienist discovers any significant problems during the X-rays.

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Step Three :

If your dentist finds problems, such as cavities or tooth decay, they’ll discuss your treatment options.

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